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All October long, organizations such as NCCER and BYF raise awareness about the diverse career opportunities in the construction industry. This event is called Careers in Construction Month and it takes place every year to help organizations reach more talented applicants as well as teach the public about the benefits presented in the industry.

The Benefits of Working in Construction

Versatility

Another big advantage of working in this industry is the extensive range of trades available. Just one project alone requires individuals from various trades like engineers, architects, masons, and many more. With so many different crafts and trades options to choose from you’re sure to find something you’ll like.

Job Security

There’s been a shortage of skilled workers for years so the demand for individuals in construction careers is high and only rising. Although the shortage causes issues such as delaying projects or not having enough manpower, it does give more people the opportunity to apply in the field. Not to mention, it provides a sense of job security.

No Degree Necessary (Degrees are Optional??)

One of the biggest advantages is that, for the most part, no college degree is required. This opens the door for many people who either chose not to go to college or were unable to afford it. However, this does not apply to every career option in the industry. For example, although a mason may not require a degree, the position of architects and civil engineer does.

Some trades, however, do require formal training or certification from either a trade or technical school but for many, you’re able to apply and join as a laborer to gain experience. Of course, like in any other industry, the more training, experience, and credentials an applicant has, the better off they will be at obtaining a job.

A More Active Lifestyle

Unlike other occupations, chances are you won’t be sitting all day. Working in construction means that you get a more active lifestyle which is better for your health. That being said, the construction industry can be very physically demanding and could have some serious negative effects on your body. Ultimately, your daily routine will be determined by the career chosen.

The Potential for Growth

Your pay depends on various factors such as location, trade, and experience. But the great thing is that there’s always a potential for growth in salary and position.

Compared to other careers, it’s fairly easy to enter a trade without experience. For many traders, you can start as a laborer and learn the craft over a few years to progress in your skills and position.

Careers in the Construction Industry

Architect

Architects are the individuals who design new buildings and construction plans. Their blueprints and concept designs include the inner structure and outward appearance of projects. This position requires a Bachelor’s Degree, Master’s Degree, or Project Management Certification. In addition, skills utilized in this career are creativity, computers, detail-oriented, math, and teamwork.

Average salary per year – $87,500

Carpentry

Carpenters build and repair frameworks and structures with wood and other materials like wood, plastic, fiberglass, and drywall. They are often involved throughout the building process from basic layout to the finishing touches. In addition to building and maintaining structures, carpenters may also play a supervisory role for framework inspection.

This career is actually among the top 10 construction trade with the highest demand. To work in this trade, individuals typically need to go to technical school, an apprenticeship program, or a trade school. Skills required for carpenters are creativity, detail-oriented, math, and troubleshooting.

Average salary per year – $56,877

Civil Engineer

Civil engineers design and supervise the construction of large-scale construction and infrastructure projects. Since one of their responsibilities is to supervise they often go back and forth from the office and project sites. This position is vital in a construction project and the pay reflects this as civil engineers are one of the top five highest-paying jobs in the industry.

This career requires education from either Bachelor’s Degree, Master’s Degree, or Project Management Certification. Additionally, civil engineers usually have skills such as computers, detail-oriented, leadership, math, and troubleshooting.

Average salary per year – $91,790

Electrician

Electricians install and maintain the electrical and power systems in new and existing structures. This means they often work with complex wiring, circuit breakers, and also large factories.

An electrician’s career generally requires a four-year apprenticeship program that qualifies individuals for both construction and maintenance work. Additionally, some electricians also attend a technical school with programs related to safety practices, electrical code, and product training. Nevertheless, most states require electricians to have a state-issued license.

Average salary per year – $67,269

Safety Technician

Safety technicians do what you would expect— they oversee safety procedures, training, and equipment. It is their job to not only identify potential risks but also develop safety plans. If an incident occurs, a site safety technician would assist with the investigation and company reports.

This role typically requires some education from a technical school, community college, registered apprenticeship program, or industry training program.

Average salary per year – $67,720

Mason

Every brick, block, or stone used to construct walls or structural supports is crafted by masons. The most common material masons use is cement. Masons will monitor drying cement and ensure that the temperature, weather, and other elements don’t prevent the cement from drying flat.

Generally, masons begin with on-the-job training and shadowing a more experienced worker or apprenticeship.

Average salary per year – $56,784

Project Manager

Just like a project manager in any other industry, construction project managers are site leaders who coordinate, budget, and supervise projects. They oversee a variety of different teams and craft professionals from the start of the project to completion. This means that they must be a team player who is able to work closely with various individuals and create detail-oriented documents.

This position requires some training in either a Bachelor’s Degree, Master’s Degree, or Project Management Certification.

Average salary per year –$92,523

Building your future with construction careers

The list of construction careers mentioned above is only a small fraction of the careers available in this industry. There are many more positions available to consider each with varying degrees of education requirements and responsibilities.

Build America together with U.S. Bridge

At U.S. Bridge, we’ve been manufacturing and engineering bridges around the world for over 80 years. Check out our bridge designs or other available services on our website!

Interested in starting your project with us? Contact us for a free quote or check our exclusive Bridge Scope tool to start building your project today.

Subcontractors play a key role in any construction project so it’s important that you hire a qualifying subcontractor that will ensure your project’s success. But how do you know what to ask or look for? Here’s a brief introduction to the role of a subcontractor and what should be included in the prequalification process.

What is a Bridge Subcontractor?

In every major bridge construction project, you’ll find a general contractor and subcontractors. The contractor is the manager of most bridge projects; they are essentially in charge of the overall coordination of the project. They’re hired by a municipality or other key stakeholders, and ensure that projects meet their approval.

Subcontractors on the other hand can range from a single person to a large company and are typically hired by the contractor. However, that doesn’t make them an employee of the general contractor as subcontractors are independent businesses. Contractors can hire subcontractors for different reasons such as performing construction tasks, supplying equipment or other materials, and more.

Why it’s so Important to Prequalify your Subcontractors

Prequalification is gathering information about interested subcontractors to assess their capability to complete the project. It’s an important part of the preconstruction phase. A well-thought-out prequalification process not only reduces liability and insurance claims but presents safer worksites and increases profit potential.

This process also ensures that you are selecting the best subcontractor for the needs of your project. Although a subcontractor may be a great choice for one project it does not guarantee that they’ll be the best choice for the next.

Even though this process may initially seem like a waste of time and resources, it actually saves your project from significant financial loss down the road.

What to Consider When Looking for a Qualifying Subcontractor?

When it comes to creating a thorough prequalifying process, it’s important to request information such as the subcontractor’s safety records, finances, litigation history, insurance coverage, relevant work history, and experience, etc.

Financial

Before hiring a subcontractor, you can request financial information such as current year revenues, total and current assets, net equity, current liabilities, average monthly billings, and if available their Dun & Bradstreet number. This will reveal any obvious red flags and help you avoid financial risks.

Litigation History

A company’s litigation history is important as it provides insight into their relationship with previous clients and how likely they are to breach a contract. Find out if they’ve ever had any labor law violations, if their license has ever been suspended or revoked, and if they’ve ever been terminated from a contract. Additionally, inquire if the company has had any judgments filed against them.

Safety Records

It is crucial that you carefully review the safety records of any potential subcontractor. Request information such as their OSHA 300 information, any citations issued, and their Experience Modification Rate for the past three years. Not only that but also implore about their training program and safety plans.

Ask for References

You’ll want to ask your potential subcontractors to provide a handful of references about– three to four. These references will demonstrate how well they collaborate with other contractors on projects as well as the quality and dependability of their work.

Qualifying subcontractors won’t have any issues providing contacts, and sometimes employees can also verify the company’s credibility.

Working with U.S. Bridge

When it comes to hiring contractors or subcontractors for your project, you want to make sure that you’re hiring the best. Our 80+ years working with various companies all across the world has provided us with the skills and experience needed for even the most challenging projects. At U.S. Bridge, we serve to meet the needs of our customers and the industry with high-quality bridges and materials.

Contact us on our website to learn more about how you can collaborate with us or fill out our exclusive BridgeScope tool for a quick quote.

Spartan Race USB Team Building

Teamwork is one of our core values at U.S. Bridge. We believe that we can accomplish more when we work together. To that end, our company always looks for ways to bring our team members together. And this month we participated in a fun U.S. Bridge team building Spartan Race. What better way to come closer as teammates and coworkers than by doing an obstacle course together!

U.S. Bridge Team Building

Spartan Race takes place all over the nation and globally. It has become one of the most popular obstacle course races in the world with thousands of participants each year. The race our team competed in was in Ohio, just outside of Cleveland. Boasting 1,500 acres of natural beauty and open space, the event took place on October 13th with hundreds of participants. And five of our team members were the brave Spartans, representing U.S. Bridge, to get into the mud together. This race is no walk in the park, as participants have to run 3+ miles of obstacle racing. While you may be able to easily run 3 miles, think about running and jumping over fire, rope climbing, wall climbing, and mud crawling. Well, that is exactly what our U.S. Bridge team did! With an impressive time of 1 hour 36 minutes and 54 seconds.

Working Together

This race is not only a physical challenge to overcome, but also a mental one. It is not an easy task to go over 3+ miles of obstacles and know that your team depends on you. This is why on this U.S. Bridge team building, our racers had to work together and communicate to finish the course. This event is also a reflection of our everyday life at the office. We know that our bridge building projects reach success when we communicate and work together. This is the quality that sets U.S. Bridge apart from other bridge companies. Our open communication and teamwork policy is the foundation of every one of our projects.

Trust U.S. Bridge with Your Next Bridge

We are proud of our team representing U.S. Bridge at Spartan Race. We know that this event was a challenging task that together they overcame and completed at an extraordinary time. Just like this obstacle course, our team at U.S. Bridge works together to bring your next bridge project to life. Contact us and get a quote for your next project.