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Every year in May the industry brings attention to different ways we can keep construction workers safe with Construction Safety Week. Although it often focuses on ways we can keep workers safe physically, it also covers mental health issues within the industry as well.

In celebration of this, here are some tips on how construction workers can stay safe and build a more secure industry.

Construction Safety Week 2022

This year, in particular, the theme “Connected. Supported. Safe.” is meant to emphasize mental health safety by encouraging workers to build connections and support within the industry.

In fact, a study conducted by CIRP revealed that 83% of construction workers struggle with mental health issues. As the world and the industry still slowly recover from COVID-19, it’s not surprising that many are bringing attention to this topic.

Connected. Supported. Safe.

Build Connections

Not only do we urge workers to stay connected with their loved ones but we also strongly suggest building connections with fellow crew members. Without a doubt, connection brings comfort, and this brings peace of mind. But building connections within your team and even better, the industry, allows for more open and honest discussions.

This leads to having a healthy work environment where a foundation of care goes beyond profits. In turn, this builds a stronger and safer crew and work environment.

Be Supportive

Though the topic of mental health might feel taboo or negative, the first step is starting the discussion. Discussion allows workers to identify any potential struggles in themselves and helps them to find an appropriate solution. Support crewmates by hearing them out, allowing for a safe and informed workplace.

When a crew member supports another crew member, it is likely to become even more support for the team as a whole. This will also give workers the courage to speak up against unsafe work conditions.

Stay Safe

Safety is the overarching theme, but what does it mean to be safe?

Each crew member has a duty to be constantly aware of any hazardous conditions that might harm the project and fellow crewmates. Communication creates a safer worksite, both verbal and written communication help. But also signage indicating on-site hazards can create a safer work environment.

Supervision is also crucial to any safe worksite. Defining and enforcing safety procedures is essential. A safety-conscious supervisor is capable of enforcing safety procedures. They can also keep an eye on operations, and take corrective action when a worker fails to follow proper procedures.

Continue Learning

What makes an industry safe and successful is when members share new discoveries and methods with each other. Sharing lessons on new innovations on common issues or streamlining tasks will make it a safer and more efficient industry. It will also permit continuous learning. This will ensure workers of all ages, backgrounds, and cultures can join together in making the construction world a much safer place to work.

Take the time to make safety a priority at your worksite. Enforcing safety procedures and standards creates a safer workplace and decreases the chance for error. Starting a conversation on mental health makes for more self-aware crews. Awareness is one of the most important tools to help supervisors support mental health in their worksite.

Stay Safe with a Reliable Team

Throughout our decades of high-quality manufacturing, we have made safety a priority above all else. Our workers and leaders work together in a healthy and collaborative atmosphere. This is how we create the best-prefabricated bridges that the industry has to offer.

Contact us for a free quote or check our exclusive Bridge Scope tool to start building your project today.

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Data is important in any job and naturally, it’s important for construction. It supports and dictates the decision-making process. However, when that data is incorrect it can make for a costly rework budget.

In 2016, data mistakes cost the United States an outstanding 3.1 trillion dollars in budget overruns and project delays. Over half of that was in the construction industry alone.

Rework in construction means losing time and money for your project. It obviously leads to serious frustrations between team members and clients. But it can be avoided by eliminating bad data.

Eliminating Bad Data

Single Focal Point

Deciding where you could benefit most from having data-driven insight and clear value will maximize your return on investment (ROI). This will encourage organizational buy-in.

For example, some industry leaders start with safety and quality assurance, two areas where data is readily available. Having a single point of focus directs the efforts of individuals, which accelerates the impact of improvements.

Identify your Data

Many firms revealed in a survey that the volume of data they use is overwhelming. They reported feeling lost and not knowing where to start. Though only 36% of the surveyed firms reported implementing a process to identify bad data. In fact, many industry leaders stated that it took nearly two years to completely “clean” their own data.

Preventing this time-hogging undertaking involves standardizing data capture. This can confirm accurate and actionable insight.

Structure your Data

It is extremely important to keep all data in a specific environment. This also means having a single preference solution to any impending situation that might arise. This will help to fuse complementary technology solutions with a strong integration capability to help facilitate the amount of project data.

This will help you avoid not having information or the correct information you need readily available when your construction team needs it. Using a specific data environment also makes collaboration between project managers much easier all while helping avoid creating more bad data and rework in construction.

Double Check Everything

Double-checking everything might be painful and tedious, but much of the bad data is due to small mistakes. According to a report conducted by FMI and Autodesk, 24% of bad data is either inaccurate or incorrect. Simple typos can make a huge difference when collecting data.

Obviously, this will take more time so, create a dedicated team or invest in an outsourced company. By doing something as simple as double-checking your work you can avoid costly mistakes.

Data Management Staff

When hiring staff, look for data management and analysis skills in potential candidates. These skills continue to be a critical advantage for construction firms. Teach and train these skills to employees who do not already possess them.

Firms must also evaluate existing processes and standards in order to better understand where data is bad or incomplete.

After hiring a devoted staff to manage and analyze data, implement a formal data strategy. Doing so will lift the burden from already busy supervisory staff.  Formal training can also help, as it is a common part of implementing a common data strategy. This training can reinforce additional on-the-job training.

Formal data strategies also improve data consistency and insights. It will also take the guessing work out of the equation for project management and field supervision staff.

Save on Rework

It is important to implement all of these key points in the battle against bad data. It is also healthy for a firm to think of new and innovative ways to fight bad data. Use what makes sense, if something doesn’t work, don’t be afraid to scrap it in favor of something better.

Bad data will only create bigger problems down the line, so implementing decisions to preemptively stop bad data now will help you avoid expensive rework in construction projects.

Build with U.S. Bridge

At U.S. Bridge, we work with the highest quality materials and engineers when designing and building bridges. Not to mention, our bridges are well-made, easy to maintain, and available in a variety of design and support types.

With decades of experience and our team of dedicated experts, you can feel confident in trusting an industry leader to build your bridge.

Contact us today for a free quote or use our exclusive Bridgescope tool!

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Construction companies have adopted technology quickly, but because of this, they are more susceptible to cyberattacks. According to NordLocker, construction is at the top of the list of industries targeted by cyberattacks, specifically ransomware. This can result in hundreds, if not thousands of dollars lost for construction companies; which is why many companies are investing in cyber insurance for construction projects.

Here are some reasons why you should invest in cyber insurance to protect your company.

Cyber Attacks

Unfortunately, it appears that cybercrime instances are rising. And while it might seem as if targeting a large corporation would provide hackers with the chance for the biggest return, in actuality, smaller companies are more susceptible to attack. The reason behind this is that large companies have the resources and capital to allocate funds to cybersecurity while smaller companies don’t.

Social engineering is also another form of cybercrime in construction. A hacker may pose as a seemingly trustworthy but unknown person, like a vendor, to gain access to company credentials. Phishing, or the use of fake emails or websites, is a great example of this. A hacker may impersonate another company or individual and send fraudulent emails to access information.

There are a couple of things you can do to help avoid cyber attacks like hiring cybersecurity specialists, training employees to recognize phishing, and automatically backup up your daily data. But ultimately, investing in something like cyber insurance would be better.

Cyber Insurance in Construction

Because of the rise in ransomware and cyber attacks in the industry, cyber insurance in construction is gaining popularity as a preemptive form of protection. Here are some other reasons why companies should consider cyber insurance:

  1. The Rise of Cybercrime
    It’s a fact- cybercrime is on the rise. In fact, one in six construction companies reported a ransomware attack in 2020. Dealing with cyber attacks leaves you vulnerable to data and money loss. Safeguard against any potential loss by investing in cyber insurance for your construction company.
  2. Project Delays
    The true price of cybercrime is the amount of time your business is held hostage. Nowadays, most companies rely on technology to function. Cyberattacks can halt projects and make it difficult to access important day-to-day information. As a result, the loss of business is something that could potentially drag on for days or even weeks.
  3. Reputation
    Customers and contractors may hesitate to do business with you in the future if you have a data breach in your past. It signifies to clients that you are susceptible to cyberattacks and that therefore their data is at risk should they work with you. It doesn’t paint a strong or likable appearance for your company.
  4. Liability Coverage
    Construction companies collect and store valuable information about their clients. By having cyber insurance in construction, companies can protect themselves from lawsuits or fines in the event of a ransomware attack. Not to mention, it brings peace of mind if your company ever becomes a victim of cyberattacks.

Companies spend money to protect physical assets. They must take the same steps to protect cyber assets too. Therefore, cyber insurance in construction is more important than ever.

A Reliable and Trusted Brand

U.S. Bridge works with companies all over the world to build long-lasting and easy-to-maintain bridges. We design our bridges with the latest innovations in mind. Our team brings engineering and manufacturing expertise to every project and safety in every way is important to us.

Ready to start your next project? Contact us today to learn more!

Cash flow for a business indicates how much money they are spending and how much money they are making. A positive cash flow means that the business is earning more money than it is spending. A negative cash flow means the opposite and is a scary proposition for any business to encounter.

Cash flow in construction projects is exceedingly important. Construction jobs often rely on a steady flow of materials and labor to complete them. However, construction projects are often prone to large influxes of cash, say at the beginning of a project. And it may be weeks or months until another payment is made by the client.

This type of cash drought can leave construction teams in a tough spot, especially when looking to pay bills, purchasing more materials, or even meeting their payroll.

Why Forecasting Cash Flow is Important

It’s easy to assume that as long as money is coming in, you won’t encounter any cash flow problems. However, successfully managing your cash flow can also allow you to accurately forecast. By predicting when you’ll be paid and how much, as well as taking account of expenses that are on the horizon, it’s easy to anticipate cash droughts and avoid them. It also helps teams stay on budget. By maintaining a current account of what money has been spent and received, construction teams can see the larger picture of where the job is in terms of the overall budget.

How to Manage Cash Flow in Construction

Managing cash flow in construction projects is namely the same as any other business, but there are a few things you should pay close attention to:

  • Change orders – Process these when received, not when the project is complete. A change order is often the result of inclement weather or a need for more labor, materials, etc. Processing these orders quickly will positively impact the project’s cash flow.
  • Invoices – Don’t wait to invoice clients. Invoice them as soon as possible and as quickly as you can. Many companies expect a 30 day grace period to pay invoices, so in most cases, you’ll still have to wait weeks for the money to appear. You can also provide small incentives for businesses to pay their invoices faster; such as a 2% discount if they pay in 14 days. 
  • Payment methods – Another way to ensure faster payment is to provide multiple ways for clients to pay invoices. Make sure to include electronic payments and credit cards as part of your plan. Electronic payments mean that you get paid quickly and easily which increases cash flow and day-to-day operations.
  • Finance big purchases- Instead of paying all in one go, consider financing big purchases from suppliers. This will allow you more cash on hand to be used for the project. This does mean however that you’re at risk for interest charges but you may be able to write them off as business expenses.

Cash flow in construction companies operates differently than most businesses as not all projects are the same. That means that improving your cash flow in a project may require the use of different strategies.

Build a Strong Foundation with U.S. Bridge

At U.S. Bridge we work with our construction teams to successfully manage all aspects of a project, including cash flow. Please contact us if you would like to learn more about our bridge engineering and manufacturing or are interested in working with us. 

Or check out our exclusive BridgeScope tool for a quick quote today!

Even as temperatures drop, construction work continues. It’s important for worker safety and health, and job productivity for all workers to stay warm as much as possible during winter construction.

While job efficiency is important, an even more important factor is worker health. Without healthy employees, a whole construction can get disrupted and cause delays. The health of any worker is a crucial area of concern during the cold winter months.

Here are five ways that a construction worker can stay warm during the cold winter months:

1. Watch Fingers & Toes

The most exposed parts of our bodies, our extremities, are often the most vulnerable in cold weather. When it’s cold, it forces our bodies to work harder to keep blood flowing to our core.

That means exposed areas such as our fingers and toes are prone to suffer from a cold-related injury such as chilblains or frostbite. Wool socks and warm gloves are the first lines of protection against the cold. If one pair of gloves isn’t enough, look into glove liners.

Also, consider using composite-toe boots as opposed to steel-toed boots during winter construction. Steel-toed boots can exacerbate the cold by not keeping your toes warm. Though a steel toe does offer more protection for your toes, a composite toe boot will keep your toes warm throughout the cold day. Hand warmers and feet warmers can also help keep you warm. Plus, they can be easily concealed.

2. Stay Dry

Nothing is worse than being cold and wet at the same time, especially on cold and slushy days. Sometimes winter construction means snow, sleet, rain, or a messy combination of all three. If it’s not bad enough to shut down the site for the day, be sure to stay dry.

Wearing moisture-wicking material close to your skin will help keep moisture from lowering body temperature. One last way to stay dry is probably the most obvious, but goes without saying; invest in a waterproof outer layer as well for even more protection against damp weather.

3. Have Extra Pairs of Everything

Imagine yourself waking up on a cold winter morning, you are getting ready for the workday, and you put on your favorite pair of long johns, and you find a giant hole in the most inconvenient spot. Now you have to go through the day with a giant hole in your long johns, exposing yourself to a cold, damp tundra.

Avoid this nightmare situation by investing in extra pairs of gloves, socks, liners, moisture-wicking material, and of course, long johns. It’s also a good idea to dress in layers, so some of these extra items might be used to double up when it gets frigid for extra warmth.

4. Keep Your Head and Neck Covered

As mentioned in our first tip, keeping your extremities covered is vital to staying warm and often overlooked extremities are our ears and neck. Ears get cold extremely fast and while it’s a myth that you lose a majority of your heat through your head, it’s still wise to keep your head covered while out in the cold. Earmuffs, a warm scarf and a turtleneck will go a long way to insulating your body heat while enduring the cold weather.

Ears can be overlooked as an extremity, but they can get cold fast.

5. Fuel Your Body

Have a thermos with you of a hot beverage or soup to help you stay warm. Your body uses a lot of energy when you’re working, especially in the cold so it’s important to have hot beverages and meals to fuel your body. Eat an extra meal or consume hot caffeinated beverages to help you stay warm and also fight the lethargy of the cold.

During winter construction, it also helps to take frequent breaks and give crews somewhere to get warm. Make sure your workers are aware of the signs of overexposure and what to do.

All of these things will help to keep you warm on a construction site.

Build with U.S. Bridge

At U.S. Bridge, we work hard to meet the needs of our staff, our customers, and the industry with our attention to detail, our high-quality materials, and our skills.

Interested in starting your project with us? Contact us for a free quote or check our exclusive Bridge Scope tool to start building your project today.

A large-scale construction project can easily take hundreds of people from different trades to complete. But how do so many different individuals from various skills and backgrounds, work together to finish a job on time? Here are some ways to consider to improve collaboration in your construction projects.

Poor Communication Has Consequences

We all know that poor communication causes misunderstandings and can set work back in any field. But how significant is poor collaboration in an industry like construction?

Well, without a well-thought-out plan, every phase of the construction project will suffer. Poor collaboration will lead to misunderstandings, slow turnaround times, errors, and wasted time. Every delay can open the door to a number of claims or expensive penalties depending on the type of project and contract.

Investing in ways to improve collaboration can preemptively avoid these situations.

Ways to Improve Collaboration

Start at the Beginning

Every project starts with a roadmap. Use the early planning stages to bring together key players, discuss project details, establish everyone’s roles, and define expectations. Even though this may seem fundamental, it’s important that individuals feel that the project allows and insists on open communication. This will help foster better work relations among crew members and make collaboration easier.

Not to mention, this makes it easier along the way to develop plans to handle any issues that may arise.

Look for Collaborative Tools

With the rise of technology in construction, there are so many different digital tools that can help improve collaboration. Investing in a digital platform can keep your team organized, make task management more efficient, and help coordinate schedules between various employees.

There are a lot of cloud-based collaborative management systems designed for the construction industry such as Procore, PM Web, Prolog, Expedition, BuilderTrend, and Viewpoint. Users will have access to project information, make changes, and share files easily with internet access.

Plus, these systems can help track the completion of different areas of the project. That way, each team knows how far along the others are and can use that information to make decisions about their own work. This will streamline the communication process and make back and forth exchanges easier and faster. Not only would this save you time and effort but it also holds teams accountable for their work.

With so many different options available, it’ll be easier to choose a system that works best for you and your team.

Invest Now & Save Time and Money Later

Although it may be a higher initial cost to incorporate methods of improving collaboration, it’s worth it in the end. A successful project collaboration allows you to reduce inefficacies in manpower, money, time, better on-time project delivery, better company reputation, and higher ROI.

In fact, a report discovered that “companies that build high levels of trust can save millions of dollars annually from benefits that include lower turnover rates, fewer missed schedules, and more repeat business”.

Work Smarter with U.S. Bridge

Our 80 years of construction experience is why we can handle construction projects of various caliber. We are confident that our engineering and manufacturing expertise is just what you’re looking for to complete your project! 

Contact us for a free quote or check our exclusive Bridge Scope tool to start building your project today.

When thinking about technology in the construction industry, it’s easy to picture electric vehicles, pneumatic drills, and other technological advancements in equipment. However, one area that often gets overlooked is the increasing use of computers and digital tech. Even artificial intelligence has a place in the new world of construction.

How Technology is Changing the Industry

Last year’s shutdown pushed the use of technology that made many companies not only realize its inevitability but also the benefits it provides. As construction projects require many different partners, the need for technology that streamlines business operations is on the rise. The application of these digital tools not only optimizes projects but the industry as a whole in areas such as:

  • Employee productivity & efficiency
  • Cost reductions
  • Job and asset flexibility

One of the reasons for this change is the increase in data. Thanks to the growing use of technology and computers, more data is made for construction projects. Thus, causing data analytics to gain popularity in engineering and construction to how companies can use it to improve their business process.

However, according to a study by FMI, 95% of the data collected in the industry goes unused. This highlights perhaps the two biggest issues about technology in the construction landscape- adoption and integration.

It’s possible to collect data on everything from worker efficiency and supply chain delays to overall project costs. Unfortunately, it’s a challenge to use this information when so many of these new technologies aren’t integrated.

Not to mention, the tools that companies need to integrate all of their data may not exist yet. And, even if they do, it may require a hefty upfront cost.

The Growing Use of AI

Another new technology that’s changing the construction industry is artificial intelligence. The term AI describes a machine or computer that is able to do functions similar to humans such as problem-solving or pattern recognition. Machine learning is a subset of AI that uses statistical techniques to analyze large amounts of data. It can do a range of actions like notify project managers about an error, filter out spam emails, or advanced safety monitoring.

Another example of AI in construction is Building Information Modeling. BIM helps engineers, architects, and other professionals to efficiently plan and design structures by using virtual simulation to create 3D models of projects. It saves companies time and money while also providing stakeholders with 3D models to analyze the impact of projects.

Success with U.S. Bridge

Technology is a great tool that is transforming the construction industry. Learn more about the ongoing changes in technology in the industry in our blogs. Or, find out more about how U.S. Bridge has everything you need to make your project a success through our website!

Contact us for a free quote or check our exclusive Bridge Scope tool to start building your project today.

Construction sites are a common place for trespassing and theft to occur, especially when working on residential and commercial sites. In fact, a study conducted found that less than 25% of all items stolen from construction sites are ever recovered. Strong construction site security can keep workers safe, save companies money, and keep projects on time.

Here are some key tactics to consider for maintaining a tight security and keeping your workers and materials safe.

Fences & Locks

Secure fences and locks are a great way to deter trespassers. Make sure that your construction site has a perimeter fence with strong locks to protect equipment storage, expensive supplies, and data. For an even more effective site security, consider tools like electronic locks with keycard or code access.

It’ll provide stronger protection and appear more intimidating to thefts or invaders. Plus, you can even limit access to areas of the job site for certain individuals.

Posts Signs Around the Site

Don’t underestimate the benefit of a well-placed sign. Signs that the site is under 24×7 video surveillance, as well as fines and penalties, can go a long way. This is a great option especially for construction sites that are left unoccupied for extended periods. Having signs around will often prevent theft and vandalism from young trouble-makers looking to stir up some trouble. 

Invest in the Right Tools

Video surveillance systems are a great construction site security solution. They can perform multiple functions, including a full view of your site, 24/7 motion-recording, or even thermal detection. Some systems are also monitored live by security companies who can directly contact the authorities if needed.

Nowadays there are a lot of different options for alarm systems. Instead of getting a loud overbearing alarm, consider a silent alarm that directly notifies essential personnel. This way you can avoid panicking workers or the thief and catch them without delaying the project.

If an alarm system is out of the budget, bright lighting is another great option that will keep your workers and materials safe. Not only will it make it easier for your crew but tools like floodlights make it difficult for thieves to hide or operate unseen. This can discourage them from stealing from your site to look for easier prey. 

On-site Security 

Hiring on-site staff is always an option when you’re looking for strong construction site security. However, this option may be better suited for bigger construction projects or those in residential and commercial areas. Depending on your location, you should be able to find various options for private security for hire.

While it may seem unnecessary, it can save you not only the money of replacing equipment and tools but also lost project time. Compare the costs against purchasing tools like cameras and an alarm system vs personal security to determine which option works best for your project.

Keep Meticulous Records

One easy and effective method for preventing theft is tracking tool usage and inventory. Knowing that at the end of the day someone is checking the items may dissuade workers from attempting to swipe a small piece.

Keep detailed records of what materials and machines are on your site. Write down serial numbers, the equipment’s PIN, or use barcodes to keep easy track of your items and where they should be. Consider registering with companies like the National Equipment Register or the Heavy Equipment Registration to register your heavy equipment. Registering your equipment will help law enforcement to locate and recover your stolen items.

Construction site security concerns everyone involved in the project. Enforce a zero-tolerance policy regarding site access and site conduct. This policy along with the tips above should keep your construction site safe.

Build with U.S. Bridge

With decades of bridge design and building experience, U.S. Bridge is proud to work with companies all around the world. Our bridges are well-made, easy to maintain, and available in a variety of designs. We are confident that our engineering and manufacturing expertise will fit the needs of your project. Contact us on our website to learn more about our bridges or how we can help you with your project. Or fill out our exclusive BridgeScope tool for a quick quote!

Whatever span you need to cross, U.S. Bridge has what you need.

Unresolved conflicts in any workplace can cause a handful of lingering ill-effects such as poor morale, hostility, and inefficient work. The most effective way to handle a dispute is by being prepared with a response plan. To help we’ve compiled a list of tips for conflict resolution in the construction industry.

Addressing the Conflict

Whether passive or combative, allowing conflict to linger is deadly for workplace morale and productivity. Disagreements can easily occur in projects between crew members within a team, supervisors, suppliers, or contractors. Your first step should be to address the conflict head-on as quickly as possible with all the parties involved. The most effective way to do this is by understanding the underlying points of the situation.

Arguments are often due to misunderstandings between parties caused by poor communication or by different interpretations of the project. Sometimes the wrong materials are delivered, equipment is damaged, or a crew member isn’t abiding by company rules. This can delay productivity and jeopardize the project.

As construction sites are already a stressful environment, you might have to calm everyone down before you can get them to calmly discuss what happened. Building a timeline and talking to others helps ensure that there isn’t another underlying cause that you’ve missed that could arise again later.

Then, once you’ve identified every individual involved and their point of view you can then begin to determine how everyone arrived at their current state. 

In some instances, it is easier to keep the dispute contained, however, if the issue is more pervasive it may need to be addressed at a larger scale, for instance, throughout an entire department.

Developing a Resolution

A strong conflict resolution ensures that everyone impacted understands the decision initiated. When developing a conflict resolution on construction sites, or really in general, chances are not everyone will be thrilled with the final result. Demonstrating competence, fairness, and respect for the project and all its stakeholders will encourage others to feel confident in your decisions.

By this point, you’ve already identified the root cause. Most likely your project is comprised of various team members, so you want to build a compromise that will salvage your relationship.

But don’t just focus on the people, instead, look at the problem itself. Consider what is important vs. what is urgent for the matter at hand and the project overall. An acceptable solution often requires both disputants to compromise.

Be clear in your delivery. It’s vital that everyone understands what to expect moving forward. Once a decision is made, offer a rationalization and a follow-up to make it easier for others to accept.

Consider Proactive Measures

You don’t have to wait until after a confrontation to start thinking about how to stop fights. Businesses can take proactive steps to avoid conflicts by building teamwork and enrolling their crew in conflict resolution training. Although this may seem more costly and time-consuming in the beginning, it does save crew time, money, and face by being able to avoid conflict before it even begins. Not to mention, it leaves a better impression on others.

In the end, conflicts are going to happen in any workplace. What’s important is how you react to them. The best way to keep productivity, employee morale, and overall job satisfaction up is through a well-established plan

Success with U.S. Bridge

When it comes to your construction project you only want the best. Our 80+ years working with various companies all across the world has provided us with the skills and experience needed for even the most challenging projects.

At U.S. Bridge, we serve to meet the needs of our customers and the industry with our high-quality materials and skills.

Interested in starting your project with us? Contact us for a free quote or check our exclusive Bridge Scope tool to start building your project today.

A crisis on a construction site can mean a lot of different things; a natural disaster, medical emergency, hazardous materials or accidents, and more. No matter what it is, a crisis will always have a huge impact on job sites and project funding. The best way to mitigate its effects is with a well-developed crisis management plan. But how do you plan for the unexpected?

The Importance of a Crisis Management Plan

A crisis in any job occupation is a mess and naturally the same applies to construction. It affects all subcontractors, trades, and shipments involved in the project. Plus the delay means a potential loss of money and credibility. A company or crew that can successfully navigate that kind of situation not only proves its leadership and adaptability but also leaves a positive impression.

A prompt and well-organized response will minimize the negative effects of a crisis on the project and your business.

Identify Potential Crises

In order to properly plan for something, you need to know what exactly you’re planning for. Obviously, this becomes tricky when you’re trying to plan for something unexpected. But one way to make it easier is to identify every potential crisis in a project before construction even begins. Even if it never actually happens it’s good to acknowledge every area of the project that could go wrong or that could be a potential danger to the crew. Once you thoroughly identify every potential crisis then you are able to take the next step of the planning process.

Develop a Response

With your list of potential crises, you can now begin crafting a practical strategy. The best crisis management plan is tailored to the construction project and takes location, type of construction, and external conflict into consideration. Understanding what and who is needed for each crisis early on will help you establish a well-planned and effective response. Using this information, create step-by-step templates for different emergency situations. This guide should include a list of risk factors, site hazards, and each person’s role before, during, and after the crisis.

Now, you can then begin to consider what resources such as equipment and materials are needed to address the situation. In addition, you should predetermine your evacuation routes and communication line beforehand and confirm that your crew knows as well.

Establish a Communication Line

An important part of your crisis management plan is establishing a line of communication with local off-site first-aid responders such as hospitals, police, and fire departments. Connecting first responders with construction engineers, project managers, or others who have a thorough understanding of the job site will speed the crisis response. In addition, develop an efficient method to communicate with employees and their families in emergency situations.

The coordination of a well-developed crisis management plan will help you not only handle the crisis as it happens but become pivotal in the investigation of the crisis afterward.

Train your Team

A good crisis management plan is only helpful if your team actually knows it. Training will help your team recognize their areas of weakness as well as any weaknesses in the plan itself. Include a safety checklist to determine how prepared your team and job site are for a real crisis.

Create a system or policy that confirms that training is updated regularly to ensure the best results. Conducting mock drills and training will not only reinforce the plan to your crew but also produce a prompt and well-trained response.

Consider the Aftereffects 

The crisis doesn’t just end when the emergency is over. As a business, it’s important that you have a public relations strategy prepared to avoid causing irreparable damage to the company. This plan of action should specify what you can and can’t say as well as who will be overseeing public announcements. It’s important to have a strategy in place beforehand when you have more time to think than make a mistake in the heat of the moment.

Working with U.S. Bridge

Our 80 years of construction experience is why we can handle construction projects of various caliber. We are confident that our engineering and manufacturing expertise is just what you’re looking for to complete your project! Contact us on our website to learn more about how we can turn your project into a success or fill out our exclusive BridgeScope tool for a quick quote.